A country scene peels back to reveal urban decay
Oxfordshire Uncovered
While the county of Oxfordshire has many positive attributes, it also features great inequality. For every show of affluence for which places like Oxford, Henley and Chipping Norton are known, there are clusters of individuals and families living in poverty. Our new report Oxfordshire Uncovered explores the hidden social problems in the county and the effect they have on the social fabric and cohesion of our community.

This report sets about uncovering those areas and themes where pockets of deprivation can be found, and where communities are struggling. To do this, we have gathered together information from many sources, which allow us to compare the picture in Oxfordshire with the rest of England, and to visualise the granular detail of the areas of social need specific to our county.

View the full report

Some key facts from the report:

  • 15 neighbourhoods are in the 20% most deprived in England
  • Oxford is the least affordable place to live in Britain, with houses costing 16 times the local annual income
  • Around 600 people are homeless
  • Oxford’s Key Stage 2 (age 7–11) school results are in the bottom 25% nationally
  • There were nearly 10,000 cases of domestic abuse cases involving children in 2013–14
  • On average, two children in every Oxfordshire classroom are young carers, and nearly 40% of them have special educational needs
  • There are over 115,000 over-65s – the fastest-growing age group in the county
  • Around half of people aged 65+ say TV or pets are their main company

Front cover of Oxfordshire Uncovered

 

 

To read the full report, please view it using the link below, or contact us to request a printed copy.

View Oxfordshire Uncovered (online flipping book)

Download Oxfordshire Uncovered (PDF)

Download the references list with links to sources

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    Michael Oglesby, a UK businessman and philanthropist
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    Coutts Million Pound Donor Report
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Legacy for a Legend

When Paul Thompson died of a sudden cardiac event, his wife and friend created a named fund in his memory that is used to fund life-saving defibrillators.

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Royds Withy King

Withy King’s patron fund with OCF helps us deliver a professional, efficient service to our donors and grant recipients, and helps them become more strategic with their charitable giving.

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The Maggie Evans Fund

This named fund, which helps children discover a love of books, was created in memory of Maggie Evans, who took her own life aged just 29, after a short but intense illness with depression.

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